Georgia Travel Diary 3-Georgian Bread

Food is an essential component of any travel that one embarks upon. If I am traveling to a new destination, my mind first searches for the food/cuisine found in that place. This is not only because I love to eat and cook, but would hold true for most travel enthusiast. Traveling is the journey that one sets upon to learn new things about the place one visits, it’s people, it’s culture and its food and cuisine, and in the process to discover or rediscover oneself too. This would be the true definition of what traveling means for me.

As already mentioned in the Georgia travel Diary : 1 blog post, the food, wine and oldest wine making method of this place was what drew us to visit the country Georgia. I would like to share the pictures that I took when I visited the local bakery.

Shoti-Georgia bread
Shoti-Georgia bread

Local bakeries making the Georgian Bread called Shoti is a typical sight that we get to see in all the streets. This local and typical Georgian bread that is called Shoti or Shoti puri can be similar to the Indian bread called Tandoor Roti or Naan, or to the Afghani Naan or the Arabic Kuboos that I see here in the UAE. All these require the Tandoors or clay ovens for baking the bread. It is customary to be serving the Shoti along with wine, the local winemaker we visited told us and offered us this bread and samples of his homemade wine-both the red wine as well as the white wine.

Wine tasting at the local wine maker

Wine tasting at the local wine maker, see he offered us the bread.

I saw this bread bakery in Kvareli town. After our day trip was over and our hired taxi dropped us at the hotel, we set out on foot to explore the peaceful town of Kvareli.

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Kvareli Town
Kvareli Town
Kvareli (City Centre) Town
Kvareli (City Centre) Town

After stopping to taste the local ice-cream at the supermarket shops lining the road, we came across people carrying freshly baked bread in paper rolls or sheets. I followed the road from where I saw people were coming with bread and reached this bakery. It was already late in evening and the baker was busy baking the last batch of bread. I requested for clicking the snaps and he immediately agreed. He could not speak English and still we were able to communicate, this is best part of any travel. He was busy doing his job without being bothered by my questions or me moving around in his bakery to click the pictures of the bread being baked.

The oven is called Tone. It more or less resembled an Indian Tandoor, only the shape could be bit different if I am not wrong.

The oven to bake Shoti is called Tone.
The oven to bake Shoti is called Tone.
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The tools used to remove the bread from the hot oven.
The bread dough
The bread dough
This could be the vessel to make the dough
This could be the vessel to make the dough
The special tools to remove the bread from the oven.
The special tools to remove the bread from the oven.
With one he scraps the bread free from oven and with the other looped one he lifts the bread, using both he removes the bread from the oven.IMG_4583
The baker expertly removes the hot bread from the Tone.
The baker expertly removes the hot bread from the Tone.
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The hot bread from the oven is kept on the wooden rack to cool and sold to customers as they walk into the bakery.
Freshly Baked Shoti.
Freshly Baked Shoti.

As we were watching the baker busy with the bread making, we saw two customers walk into the bakery, purchase the bread and walked away, it was wonder in their eye to see me busy clicking away pictures with my camera.

The freshly made bread smelled so amazing and our mouths watered and suddenly I felt so hungry. Every Resturant meal I ate I had ordered this Shoti bread. I am fond of any type of Tandoor roti or bread and hence it was perfect for me to eat this typical Georgian bread at every meal during my full tour. 🙂

Enjoy!!

ashu

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3 thoughts on “Georgia Travel Diary 3-Georgian Bread

    1. Hi Arv, thank you. Yeah I notice so many similarities in customs too with a little change here and their, travel takes you closer to the people and the customs, culture etc.
      Yeah the Mughlai cuisine came with them and don’t we enjoy those delectable dishes :).
      I am happy for the fact that I get to eat my garlic naans :)!!
      Thanks for the interactions lovely comments, nice talking with you here.
      ashu

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ashu, the more we travel we understand everything better. we become more humane!
        Since I’m a vegetarian, I’m not a great proponent of Mughlai! 🙂
        It’s always interesting to read your posts! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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