Tag Archives: Georgiadiaries

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: ORDER

For the Weekly Photo Challenge: Order. 

Flea market stall in Tbilisi, Georgia.

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Biryani Handis stacked in order on top of each other in front of a shop in the Charminar area, Hyderabad, India.IMG_6978

Display of souvenirs made of sea shells in a shop in Mahabalipuram, Tamil Nadu, India.

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Goods displayed from Turkey in the Turkish Pavilion in Global Village, Dubai.

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These were few of the numerous photographs from my travels that I loved sharing for this photo challenge. Hope you all enjoyed viewing them 🙂 .

ashu

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WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: BEING GREEN

For this Week’s Photo Challenge: It is easy being Green, I am sharing couple pictures from my Georgia travel.

Surround oneself with the beauty of nature and enjoy the best moments of the day 🙂 , capturing the different shades of green.

ashusphotography-WPC-Being Green
ashusphotography-Georgia travel
ashusphotography-Georgia Travel
ashusphotography-Georgia travel (Gudauri)
ashusphotography-Georgia travel (Gudauri)

ashu

Khinkali, A Georgian Dish

ashusphotography-Georgia travel
ashusphotography-Georgia travel

The visit to Georgia in July 2016 introduced me to this dish- Khinkhali, a dish that I find to be a similar version of Momos that I am so very fond of eating and making in my kitchen.

The first lunch after landing in Tbilisi, Georgia in a restaurant in the busy Tbilisi Center, the menu card displayed this bigger version of dumplings that looked similar to momos. The guide told us it is called Khinkali and also informed us the way how we were supposed to eat it. It is a boiled dumpling with filling inside, a fried version could also be seen in the menu card. The inside filling could be of either Beef, lamb, chicken, potatoes or cheese etc. The menu card in the restaurant displayed the various Khinkali that were sold.

ashusphotography-Georgia travel
ashusphotography-Georgia travel

While visiting the Svetitskhoveli Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Mtskheta, we stopped for lunch in the neighboring restaurant and I was able to see and click these amazing pictures of the Khinkali in making.

The Khinkali are shaped and kept on a board and are ready to be put into boiling water.

ashusphotograpy-Khinkali
ashusphotograpy-Khinkali
ashusphotography-Khinkali
ashusphotography-Khinkali
ashusphotography-Khinkali added tot he boiling water for cooking.
ashusphotography-Khinkali added to the boiling water for cooking.
ashusphotography-Khinkali getting cooked
ashusphotography-Khinkali getting cooked
ashusphotography-Georgia travel
ashusphotography-Georgia travel
ashusphotography-Khinkali
ashusphotography-Khinkali

The hot Khinkali is then served to us and we hold at the folded top part and eat the rest of the khinkali and leave behind the top thick part on the plate. The filling is as per our choice and order.

I find it interesting to note that the mountainous regions are colder and one needs food that is easy to make, simple, and hot. The Nepal travel saw steaming hot momos being listed on the menu cards, the Georgian travel to the Mtshekta region saw the Khinkali in the process of making. This Georgian dish is famous throughout the country, and I would like to add here that it is similar to the steamed Momos, only the size is bigger and also the coating seems to be thicker. The potato and cheese filled Khinkali was too bland for my taste with only salt added , hence I could not relish them both.

Travelling to places makes us aware of not only the region, landscape and people but also the food habits and one finds a lot of similarities in food across far-flung regions with similar dishes but having the regional names. I find similarity of the Khinkali to the dumplings that one gets to see in a Chinese, or Tibetan or a Nepal menu. Do take every opportunity to travel, so that the foodies like me get to learn new recipes after each tour 🙂

I have tried making my version of the Khinkali yesterday and that will be my next post, so do return to check that out too 🙂 .

Enjoy!

ashu

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia Travel Diary 6- Georgian Feast/Supra

Traveling, for me, is to embark on a path that is unknown. Whenever I am traveling to a new place, the foodie in me is very much keen and interested to taste and experience the local cuisine from that region. Though I prefer mostly vegetarian food as I am not a very fond eater of lamb or red meat in particular, but am always keen to learn new region specific recipes, the family does enjoy eating non-veg food.

The Georgia tour package included plans of eating lunch on one of the days at the local farmers house, we had booked it in our itinerary with the tour operator, and ate the Georgian feast which is called as Supra, at his place. We went to the farmers house on the third day of our tour after starting the day visiting Gremi and the Nekresi monasteries. We had informed our tour guide of eating only chicken and hence meat or pork was not included in the lunch. Visiting the local farmer for lunch is part of the Georgian tour package, it gives us visitors a taste of the local homemade food and wine, get to know the local cuisine and customs associated. As it is a country famous for its wine, wine plays an important role in the local customs. As we reached our host Mr. Gavazi’s house, we were warmly welcomed by him and his gracious wife. They could not speak English, but I found them to be very friendly and a humble couple. The table was laid outside in the porch area of the house, had already been set when we reached with various dishes. The numerous plates were filled with lovely homemade dishes, fruits and salad vegetables all fresh produce from their farm. When my hubby needed some spice and asked for green chili, immediately the farmer plucked fresh chili from his yard.

I will share some pictures of the our Georgian feast- Supra 🙂

ashusphotography-Georgian Supra: Table laid with dishes.
ashusphotography-Georgian Supra: Table laid with dishes.
ashus-Georgian cuisine, table with homemade dishes.
ashus-Georgian cuisine, table with homemade dishes.

The table had all the homemade dishes, even the honey and cheese was homemade. The farmer’s wife had prepared all the dishes, and on our request only chicken was served as part of the non-veg dish and hence other meat is missing from this spread of dishes.

ashusphotography-Beetroot and Onion salad.
ashusphotography-Beetroot and Onion salad.

I loved tasting this dish, it was the first time I was tasting beetroot in this preparation. The onion in it was giving a nice crunch to the soft bite of the beetroot. It was a sweetish tangy taste.

ashusphotography-Sulguni cheese
ashusphotography-Sulguni cheese

This is the famous Georgian cheese called as Sulguni, used in many of the dishes including the national dish named as Khachapuri. It is salty to taste and bit elastic, crumbles easily. It was a bit too salty for my taste, not used to eating such salty homemade cheese :). I am used to eating homemade cottage cheese i.e. Paneer, it is without salt, unless we add salt to the milk before curdling it.

ashusphtograph-Lobiani
ashusphotography-Lobiani

This is the kidney beans or Lobiani as they call it. The above dish is mashed up Lobia or beans with onions. It had the Georgian salt, was without chili, and hence we needed some spice and hubby asked for the green chili 🙂 .

ashusphotography-Ajapsandali
ashusphotography-Ajapsandali

Ajapsandali, as per the guide, hoping I have spelt it correct :). This  tasted very much like out Indian Brinjal and tomato sabji. This was the Eggplant cut into long thin slice, fried and then cooked with onion and tomatoes with the Georgian salts and herbs. It tasted good, but yeah this too was not spicy.

ashusphotography-Potato fry
ashusphotography-Potato fry

This is also regularly eaten, as in most parts and one of my favorites, fried potatoes sprinkled with the Georgian salt.

ashusphotography-Georgian Khachapuri
ashusphotography-Georgian Khachapuri

Khachapuri is the national dish of Georgia. It is flatbread filled with cheese filling, Sulguni cheese is used. It is called with different names as per the filling, cheese either used as stuffing or as spread on top and the names given accordingly.  If it is filled with Lobia it is called as Lobiani Khachapuri. This was more like our Indian flatbread- stuffed Naan, with a very cheesy tasting filling inside. It is a very rich dish.

ashusphotography- Walnut stuffed Aubergine
ashusphotography- Walnut stuffed Eggplant slices

This walnut filled Eggplant slices are served cold, and the walnut filling is so tasty, bit sharper in taste with the added salts and spices, it perfectly balances the bland and soft fried Aubergine slices. I liked this dish and am going to include in my home menus, memories of our tour :).

ashusphotography-Georgian bread Shoti
ashusphotography-Georgian bread Shoti

This is the regular bread that is a must with all the meals. We saw many bakeries making fresh bread and the locals taking home the daily supplies of bread. Do check out my post on the bread here.

ashusphotography-Fresh fruits from the garden
ashusphotography-Fresh fruits from the garden

I do not have to remind you all how the freshly from the farm fruits taste, directly on table from the trees, they were the best and very juicy. It was great feeling to eat this fresh a fruit after ages, here we are dependent on fruits sold in the supermarkets which are flown from all parts of the world 🙂 !

ashusphotgraphy-Fried chicken
ashusphotgraphy-Fried chicken

Fried chicken is the simple rotisserie style fry chicken, with the Georgian salts.

ashusphotography-homemade honey
ashusphotography-homemade honey

This homemade honey was quite thick and very granular, tasted more like an Indian sweet. It was the sweetest granular sugar syrup I felt :), but this was very tasty.

The below pictures show the different drinks served with the meal, homemade Georgian wines. Chacha is the local name of Vodka. You can check out my post on the visit to wine cellar here.

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ashusphotography- The different types of homemade Georgian Wines.
ashusphotography- The different types of homemade Georgian Wines.

The wine plays a major role in the Supra. All the different types of wine, the red and white variety, and the Chacha and the Cognac were kept for tasting, but as I do not drink, it was left untouched.

ashusphotography-Fresh tomatoes and green chili
ashusphotography-Fresh tomatoes and green chili

We saw the farm after our lunch and saw the fresh tomatoes dangling on the plants in the farm. The green chili was freshly plucked for us upon our request for chili in the salad. It was interesting to note that for salad they keep the whole tomatoes and fruits in the plates on the table along with the knife to cut as per need and not served as cut salad. Our International travels expose us to the different and unique cultures of this world, the best form of gaining knowledge and interaction with other folks, don’t you agree!

I have learnt that the spice level in Georgian food is very mild compared to our daily Indian cooking. They use salts or spice paste called as Ajika, a mix of chili, garlic, herbs and spices in their cooking. We have to place an order for the spicy chutney or hot sauces separately with our dishes in the Restaurants, it is not served or kept on the table as in most other places. This was not known to us on the first day when we landed and ate our first lunch in Georgia. I purchased a hot sauce to add to our food, later the guide informed us that we can order the Ajika sauce that is spicy :).

This was the lunch that we ate that day, it was way too much for us to finish up all that was served in the table. The food was served in the many plates that are kept on the table, instead of big serving bowls. It was interesting to note the whole table was filled-up with plates full of the served dishes, serving plates, types of glasses, bottles of drinks, and bowls of honey and trays including the whole fruits and salad vegetables. We had a good hearty and tasty meal, the farmer was very friendly and was happily chatting and answering our queries, clicking pictures with us. Our guide was our translator 🙂 as the farmer could not speak English. The lady of the house was inside the house, she had just stepped out for sometime to greet us and then to bid us goodbye, but she was too sweet and soft spoken. The farmers mother too had greeted us and again went inside the house. I too had shared some dried fruits, Pistachios and the gulf region famous Dates with the family, who were happy to receive the Dates :). We finished up the lunch and then drank some black coffee, it was good.

After the lunch we visited the farmland that was in the adjacent plot and opposite to the house. He grew Strawberries, the best that I tasted, had Peaches laden trees, the grape vineyards, could see them with green unripe grape bunches. He had farm animals too-saw two fat pigs near the fence. He grew tomatoes, Eggplant, and potatoes too. Saw a bee-hive too. This farmer too had kept the wines bottles displayed for sale.

ashusphotography-Garlic hanging in their store room
ashusphotography-Garlic hanging in their store room
ashusphotgraphy-Strawberry plants
ashusphotgraphy-Strawberry plants

The farmers father was cleaning up the strawberry patch, he gave me few of the strawberries that he plucked from the plants, they were the best that I have eaten so far in my entire life. I have never before tasted strawberries this fresh, eaten directly plucked from the plants. The old man was very happy to share them with us.

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ashusphotography-fruit trees
ashusphotography-fruit treesimg_4411
ashusphotography-Grape vines
ashusphotography-Grape vines
ashusphotography-the farm
ashusphotography-the farm

This was our visit to the local farmer for a scrumptious Georgian lunch and to visit his farmland.The whole family works in the farm. This visit reminded me so much of my hubby’s late grandmother and our rural area visit in our hometown. Farmers are people who are self sufficient, living a simple and humble life, daily working very hard in their farmland. I had the privilege of visiting our grandmother’s rice fields and to live few days with her in the village, my most cherished memories of her.

I feel happy sharing here the pictures of the Georgian dishes that I ate during my travel, and hoping to hear your thoughts about this post. Wishing to see you visit here again 🙂 for my next posts.

Enjoy!!

ashu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia Travel Diary 5-Wine Cellar Visit

ashusPhotography-Georgian Wine
ashusPhotography-Georgian Wine

When visiting the beautiful country Georgia, one has to include visits to the lush green vineyards, orchards, wine cellars and not to forget to taste the locally made wine.

ashusPhotograpy-Vineyards on both sides of the road.
ashusPhotograpy-Vineyards
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ashusPhotograpy-Vineyards on both sides of the road.

Georgia is famous and known for its ancient traditional method of wine making, and this method is inscribed in UNESCO intangible heritage list. Wine is a very integral part of every Georgian’s daily life with all the festivities and their different rituals. Wine making is a national occupation, almost all houses have grape vines growing in their land and the method of wine making is passed on from generations to generations. They use the wine making method in which an egg-shaped earthen clay pot known as Kvevri or Qvevri is used to make wine.(I am not sure about the spelling). The Georgian farmers use the Qvevri for making the wine, ageing it and then storing it. Hence this method of wine making is known as the Qvevri method.

ashusPhotography-Qvevri
ashusPhotography-Qvevri
ashusPhtograpy-Qvevri seen in Khareba Winery
ashusPhtograpy-Qvevri seen in Khareba Winery

Our Georgia tour package included a tour visit of a 300-year-old wine cellar as mentioned in the brochure given to us by our guide Nino. It was something new, different and  a fabulous experience to visit the wine cellar.

ashusPhotography-Wine cellar
ashusPhotography-Wine cellar
ashusPhotography-the wine being taken out from the qvevri that is seen buried in the ground in the wine cellar.
ashusPhotography-the wine cellar floor with the buried qvevris that are below the circular lids seen in the picture.
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ashusPhotography-the wine being taken out from the qvevri that is seen buried in the ground in the wine cellar.

The farmer had both the Red and White wines that he removed in front of us from the Qvevri that were buried deep in the ground in his cellar. The cellar was dark inside, no sunlight could come in, the walls were thick, stone and brick made. There were many old vessels, machinery, lamps, wine making tools and quite a number of assorted pots, pans, pitchers and jars that were displayed of which some might not be in use now.

ashusPhotography-wine making tools
ashusPhotography-wine making tools
ashusPhotography- The wine cellar with empty barrels, wine making tools, pots, and jars
ashusPhotography- The wine cellar with empty barrels, wine making tools, pots, and jars

Their were number of empty wine bottles stacked  very neatly in the wall, big jars, bottles filled with liquid and lemon cubes inside.

ashusPhotography-Stacked empty wine bottles
ashusPhotography-Stacked empty wine bottles

 

ashusPhotography-stacked empty bottles
ashusPhotography-Liquid filled bottle with lemon
ashusPhotograpy-wine jars/Pitchers
ashusPhotograpy-wine jars/Pitchers

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It is a Georgian tradition to offer the  local bread Shotti along with the wine, this farmer too offered us the bread. I loved the wine pots and pitchers, but unfortunately I could not buy any as souvenirs as I kept thinking I will see them some place, but did not like the ones that I came across in the souvenir shops.

ashusPhotography-wine offered for tasting and the Georgian bread called Shotti
ashusPhotography-wine offered for tasting and the Georgian bread called Shotti
ashusPhotograpy-Red wine being taken out for tasting from the buried qvevri.
ashusPhotograpy-Red wine being taken out for tasting from the buried qvevri.

Our guide Nino helped us understand how the wine is made, as the farmer could not speak English. I am writing and sharing here whatever I can recollect of the Georgian wine making method that she told us, everything was so new and interesting that I had no time to jot down each and every word of hers :).

The grapes are collected, pressed and the juice then poured into the Qvevri along with the skin, stalks, and the pips. It is then sealed and buried into the ground so that the wine can ferment for five or six months before it is opened and drunk. The wine is then kept for ageing. The Qvevri facilitates the process of  formation and ageing with the minerals that are part of it’s composition. This method of wine making is found all over the country. After the wine is removed the left over chacha-skin, stalks and pip is used to make the drink called chacha through a process, and this drink Chacha (Georgian name) is also know as Vodka. We can see that nothing from the grape plant is wasted, the whole plant gets used to make both the wine and Vodka. The local farmer at whose house we ate the Georgian lunch served us all types of drinks- Wine both red as well as white, Chacha/Vodka, and Champagne. I will make another post of the Georgian feast, Supra as they call it.

ashusPhotography-wine cellar at Nekresi Monastery, Georgia
ashusPhotography-wine cellar at Nekresi Monastery, Georgia
ashusPhotography-Picture showing a qvevri buried in the wine cellar at Nekresi Monastery, Georgia
ashusPhotography-Picture showing a qvevri buried in the wine cellar at Nekresi Monastery, Georgia

The grape varieties used determine if it is Red or White wine. We visited the many monasteries in the country and could see the wine cellars using this traditional wine making methods. The Rkatsteli and Mtsvane varieties of the grapes are used to produce the White wine. The Saperavi grape variety is used to make the Red wine.

ashusPhotography-Red wine
ashusPhotography-Red wine offered for tasting.
ashusPhotography-White wine
ashusPhotography-White wine offered from tasting

The Satsnakheli is a wooden trough usually made from a single wood that is used for as a manual foot stumping wine press.

ashusPhotography-Satsnakheli: a foot stumping wine press seen in wine cellar at Nekresi Monastery, Georgia
ashusPhotography-Satsnakheli: a foot stumping wine press seen in wine cellar at Nekresi Monastery, Georgia

It was no longer used by this wine maker as told by our guide. The grapes are put into the Satsnakheli, then manually foot pressed and the juice is directly collected in the Qvevri. Later the grape skins, stalks and pips left in the Satsnakheli are put into the Qvevris.

ashusPhotography-Satsnakheli that is no longer used for wine press by the wine maker.
ashusPhotography-Satsnakheli that is no longer used for wine press by the wine maker.

A visit to the wine cellar would not be complete if we did not buy the farmers homemade wine, and we bought one bottle of the red wine.

ashusPhotograpy-Our purchase of homemade Red wine bottle.
ashusPhotograpy-Our purchase of homemade Red wine bottle.

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As we sat and chatted along with our guide, the farmer was busy with another group of tourist who had come to visit his wine cellar.

ashusPhotography-Grape vine, Kiwi plants, qvevri in the courtyard of the local farmer
ashusPhotography-Grape vine, Kiwi plants, qvevri in the courtyard of the local farmer

As I already mentioned at the start of the post that this Qvevri method of wine making is inscribed in UNESCO intangible heritage list, hence, if you are visiting Georgia, do visit a wine cellar or winery and see it in person and get the joy of tasting the local wines.

I had a great trip and hence wished to share few details of the trip for those tourists who look up websites, blogs for information before traveling or picking up a travel destination. Are you one of them?  I sure am :).

If you want to check out my other posts on Georgia click the below number links-

Georgia Travel diary 1,

Georgia Travel 2,

Georgia travel 3,

Georgia travel 4

Hope to see you back to check out my next post that will be on the Georgian Supra.

Enjoy! Happy Traveling 🙂

ashu

Georgia Travel Diary 4-Sighnaghi town

Our tour included travel to the Kakheti region of Georgia which is famous for its wine making. The day two of our tour saw us visiting the 18th century, small yet beautiful town of Sighnaghi. It started pouring as we entered the town. We were carrying our umbrellas hence as we got down from our hired taxi, we had to open up the umbrellas. It was such a nice feeling to walk the cobbled streets of the small town, a very silent town with nobody out as it was raining. The cobbled streets and town reminded me so much of the streets of Rome.

Sighnaghi Town
Sighnaghi Town
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ashustravels-Sighnagi Town, Georgia
ashustravels-Sighnagi Town, Georgia
ashustravels-Sighnagi Town, Georgia
ashusphotography-Sighnaghi City hall
Sighnaghi town hall
Town hall
Town hall

It was an impressive town and the Restaurant Nikala that we ate our lunch at was the best of the whole tour. It is seen at the end of the street in the picture below.

Sighnaghi Town
Sighnaghi Town

The lunch I ate was a pot of beans, it was like our Indian Rajma gravy, Corn bread, Georgian bread, the hot sauce, the kebabs that my family ate and couple more things.

Wine bottles in the Resturant
Wine bottles in the Restaurant
Beans in Pot
Beans in Pot
My veg lunch, Cornmeal bread and Beans in pot
My veg lunch, Cornmeal bread and Beans in pot
The board outside another Restaurant
The board outside another Restaurant

By the time we finished our lunch the rain had stopped and the sun was bright and we could see no traces of the downpour that we had witnessed, everywhere it was dry and sunny. The old structure at further end of the town gave us the picturesque view of the Alazani valley, the impressive old fence surrounding the town, the Great Caucasus mountains and the beautiful town houses.

Sighnaghi Town
Sighnaghi Town
Sighnagi town
Sighnagi town
Old fence surrounding the town and the view of Alazani valley
Old fence surrounding the town and the view of Alazani valley

The picture above shows the old ancient fence that surrounds the town.

Caucasus mountains seen from Sighnaghi town
Caucasus mountains seen from Sighnaghi town
Sighnaghi town
Houses of the Sighnaghi town

We had seen this souvenir shop along the streets opposite the town hall and the local women were seen busy making the bags, purses and woolen caps and gloves etc.

Souvenir shop selling local handicraft items
Souvenir shop selling local handicraft items
Local handicrafts
Local handicrafts

After the town visit, lunch and clicking loads of pictures, we rode by car and reached the 300-year old wine cellar of a local farmer. Do visit again to check out the wine cellar post, that will be my next post.

Enjoy!

ashu

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia Travel Diary 3-Georgian Bread

Food is an essential component of any travel that one embarks upon. If I am traveling to a new destination, my mind first searches for the food/cuisine found in that place. This is not only because I love to eat and cook, but would hold true for most travel enthusiast. Traveling is the journey that one sets upon to learn new things about the place one visits, it’s people, it’s culture and its food and cuisine, and in the process to discover or rediscover oneself too. This would be the true definition of what traveling means for me.

As already mentioned in the Georgia travel Diary : 1 blog post, the food, wine and oldest wine making method of this place was what drew us to visit the country Georgia. I would like to share the pictures that I took when I visited the local bakery.

Shoti-Georgia bread
Shoti-Georgia bread

Local bakeries making the Georgian Bread called Shoti is a typical sight that we get to see in all the streets. This local and typical Georgian bread that is called Shoti or Shoti puri can be similar to the Indian bread called Tandoor Roti or Naan, or to the Afghani Naan or the Arabic Kuboos that I see here in the UAE. All these require the Tandoors or clay ovens for baking the bread. It is customary to be serving the Shoti along with wine, the local winemaker we visited told us and offered us this bread and samples of his homemade wine-both the red wine as well as the white wine.

Wine tasting at the local wine maker

Wine tasting at the local wine maker, see he offered us the bread.

I saw this bread bakery in Kvareli town. After our day trip was over and our hired taxi dropped us at the hotel, we set out on foot to explore the peaceful town of Kvareli.

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Kvareli Town
Kvareli Town
Kvareli (City Centre) Town
Kvareli (City Centre) Town

After stopping to taste the local ice-cream at the supermarket shops lining the road, we came across people carrying freshly baked bread in paper rolls or sheets. I followed the road from where I saw people were coming with bread and reached this bakery. It was already late in evening and the baker was busy baking the last batch of bread. I requested for clicking the snaps and he immediately agreed. He could not speak English and still we were able to communicate, this is best part of any travel. He was busy doing his job without being bothered by my questions or me moving around in his bakery to click the pictures of the bread being baked.

The oven is called Tone. It more or less resembled an Indian Tandoor, only the shape could be bit different if I am not wrong.

The oven to bake Shoti is called Tone.
The oven to bake Shoti is called Tone.
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The tools used to remove the bread from the hot oven.
The bread dough
The bread dough
This could be the vessel to make the dough
This could be the vessel to make the dough
The special tools to remove the bread from the oven.
The special tools to remove the bread from the oven.
With one he scraps the bread free from oven and with the other looped one he lifts the bread, using both he removes the bread from the oven.IMG_4583
The baker expertly removes the hot bread from the Tone.
The baker expertly removes the hot bread from the Tone.
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The hot bread from the oven is kept on the wooden rack to cool and sold to customers as they walk into the bakery.
Freshly Baked Shoti.
Freshly Baked Shoti.

As we were watching the baker busy with the bread making, we saw two customers walk into the bakery, purchase the bread and walked away, it was wonder in their eye to see me busy clicking away pictures with my camera.

The freshly made bread smelled so amazing and our mouths watered and suddenly I felt so hungry. Every Resturant meal I ate I had ordered this Shoti bread. I am fond of any type of Tandoor roti or bread and hence it was perfect for me to eat this typical Georgian bread at every meal during my full tour. 🙂

Enjoy!!

ashu

Georgia Travel Diary 2: Flowers of Georgia

The beauty of the landscape is enhanced by the flowers seen around. This Georgian tour I had many blessed moments to be surrounded by the beautiful flowers in all the places that I visited in Georgia. The vast open stretches of fields/terrain, mountains covered with wild grasses and wild flowers of many colors were so fresh and brightly colorful, and it was the perfect moments to sing and jump along in happiness. These locations reminded me of the Sound Of Music movie. I had the most amazing time adorning my hair with these beautiful flowers, the best hair accessory that I could ever lay my hands on. Everyday of the tour I got matching color flowers to go with my outfit for that day, indeed I was on top of the world.

Most Indian females love to wear flowers in the hair, I am no exception, and flowers in hair is a must whenever I am wearing my traditional look or the sari.  Georgia travel became the exception that each day of my travel I had the beautiful matching colored flower in my hair, irrespective of the outfit worn :).

Blessings drop their blossoms all around you-Rumi.

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These beautiful flowers below were seen at St. Nino’s Monastery, Bodbe.

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St. Nino's Church, Bodbe, Georgia.
St. Nino’s Church, Bodbe, Georgia.

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The Earth laughs in flowers –Ralph Waldo Emerson.

The flowers below were caught on camera during the hike to the Trinity Church from the Stepantsminda town. It was a beautiful and fun walk/hike to reach to the top to see the Gergeti Trinity Church. The town is surrounded by the mountains on all sides and we get to see the most beautiful view of the Mount Kazbegi that is at 5047 m.

Stepantsminda Town, Georgia
Stepantsminda Town, Georgia

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Gergeti Trinity Church, Georgia
Gergeti Trinity Church, Georgia
Mt. Kazbegi, Georgia
Mt. Kazbegi, Georgia

A flower blossoms for its own joy- Oscar Wilde

The street of Tbilisi adorned these flowering trees in straight line along the pavements, each tree loaded with these colorful flowers, adding color to the street as well as working its magic on travelers like me who would stop after every few steps and capture these flowers in the camera lens. I loved all these flowers that to me reminded of our very own Hibiscus flower, such variety in color and shade, simply amazing!

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Nature has the power to calm and sooth the soul. I always feel fresh and rejuvenated when I find myself in nature. It was a very happy experience to be among these gorgeous Georgian flowers.

If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere- Vincent Von Gogh.

Enjoy!

ashu

 

Georgia Travel Diary- 1

ashusTravels-Tbilisi, Georgia.
ashusTravels-Tbilisi, Georgia

Summer holidays for kids brought up the decision to go sightseeing and my elder one took up the responsibility to decide the travel destination for this summer of 2016. After having gone through a list of lot many places to select from, she had decided on Cambodia, and since the flight from UAE is via Bangkok, so it was going to be Bangkok and Cambodia. But then the scenic beauty and direct flight to Georgia was looked up, this food and wine destination stole our hearts and finally the tickets for Georgia were booked. The vineyards and oldest wine making method used in Georgia were the deciding factors for selection of this travel destination. I am writing this post after visiting the country, so I am happy to say here that it was a good choice. We went for a seven days tour, but the last two days of the tour being very hot made me think that a 4-5 days travel would have sufficed as we were going on vacation to escape from the UAE summer sun. It is a small, less populated and quiet Country with serene, beautiful scenic views of the mountains, countryside, friendly people and extremely safe to roam around even late in the night. We saw police patrols everywhere in Tbilisi when we were out  having a late dinner and later roaming the streets and shopping till late in the night.

It is a direct flight to Tbilisi from Dubai, takes you 3 hrs. to reach and visa was on arrival for the UAE residents. Air Travel was okay, a short sitting time at the Dubai airport lounge, some snacks and sweets tucked in the tummy and we set out for the short three hour air travel. The passport control at the Tbilisi airport was also quick and soon we were near the exit searching for our tour guide, Nino, a young smart girl, who was waiting for us along with the driver of the vehicle that was going to be our transport for the rest of our tour. And our seven day Georgia travel started and it was a good experience with two wonderful people, one spoke English and one could not. The driver was extremely caring and though he could not speak English, but we somehow managed to converse with Nino’s help. The advantage of travelling in private hired vehicle/hired taxi is it allows us to spend more time at places that are of our interest., the kids get to relax and be comfortable so that they are not cranky all the time 🙂 !

Tbilisi city tour through my eyes: We started the city tour in the hired taxi and I got busy click pictures through the car window.

Tbilisi
TbilisiIMG_3598
Freedom Square
Freedom SquareIMG_3668

It is a city founded in 5th Century AD, named after the hot spring found here, The streets are cobbled streets as we see in any European country and is a good blend of the old and new. Here we can find Georgian orthodox, Armenian Gregorian, Roman Catholic churches, Synagogue and Zoroastrian temple in close vicinity to each other. It was sure interesting to see this.

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Tbilisi means warm in Georgian and I can tell it sure was quite warm in July. Most of the sightseeing in Tbilisi is in the old town, and all the sites are within walking distance, yeah it helps if one is wearing comfortable shoes. We got down from the taxi and walked around the town on foot, yes the sun was at its peak so be prepared to carry a hat or cap and use sun block for protection of the skin.

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After an anxious lunch, as I was tasting the Georgian cuisine for the first time, we started our old town Tbilisi tour on foot with our tummies full of yummy meal.

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The first stop was Sulfur bath. It was amazing and also breathtaking to see the town and cobbled streets and looking up skywards to see the green lush mountains and blue sky with pure white cotton candy like clouds floating past. For me the picture was just out of a children’s reading book that show lovely mountains with beautiful blue skies. I was already getting soaked into the beauty of this city.

Abanotubani Sulfur Bath District

Sulfur Bath District
Sulfur Bath District

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Water fall, coming from the Botanical gardens (as per our guide Nino)

Souvenir shops lining the Sulfur Bath area
Souvenir shops lining the Sulfur Bath area
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Wine bottles displayed by the local Restaurants as we move through the old town.
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Grape vines
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Sioni Cathedral

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Sioni Cathedral- considered the most sacred places in the country, holds the holy cross of St. Nino. Our guide also named Nino told us St. Nino was the young woman who converted Georgia to Christianity in the early 4th Century.

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Peace Bridge, Tbilisi

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Holy Trinity Cathedral, Tbilisi
Holy Trinity Cathedral, Tbilisi

Holy Trinity Cathedral of Tbilisi is an important cathedral, and is the main Georgian orthodox cathedral. One is supposed to cover the head with a scarf and also no shorts allowed when we entered the churches in Georgia.

It was a learning experience for this traveler to know that almost all religious places be it the temples in India, the Gurudwaras, the Churches, or the Mosque that I visited in Abu Dhabi require us to cover our head, wear full length before we enter these holy places.

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Narikala Fortress

Narikala Fortress, a medieval fortification overlooking the Sololaki district. The panorama view from the Narikala fortress of the old town Tbilisi is quiet interesting, we get ample classic shots of the Tbilisi city from here.

Botanical Garden, Tbilis
Botanical Garden, Tbilis
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Panorama view from Narikala Fortress, Tbilisi
Panoramic view of Tbilisi from Narikala Fortress
Panoramic view of Tbilisi from Narikala Fortress
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Old TV Tower, Tbilisi
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Mtastminda Amusement park, Tbilisi

These above pictures were clicked from the top near the fortress. We have a rope-way to come down into the city from the top of Narikala fortress. We drove our taxi to the top but we returned down using the cable car.

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Looking down from the cable car

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The Mtkvari river and the Peace bridge captured from the cable car ride.

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We get down from the cable car and walk out to this monument that says Europe Square.

‘Travelling leaves you speechless and then turns you into a storyteller’- Ibn Batuta

The quote perfectly describes my thoughts, and here I make an effort to take you along on the travels through my posts with the travel pictures captured by me.

This was our first day site-seeing in Tbilisi, Georgia. Hope you all liked going through the pictures as much as I loved sharing them here with you all. More about this beautiful country famous for its wine making and food in another post on the blog tomorrow.

ashu.

 

 

 

 

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: MORNING

My entry for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Morning.

This was the view of the Caucasian mountains that I first saw in the morning from my hotel window during my recent visit to Gudauri, Georgia.

Gudauri is famous for its Ski slopes, and the mountains were beautifully green in color at this time, which otherwise would be white as covered in snow during the winters. I could see the mountain tops covered in snow, some not even visible due to thick fog, moving clouds, in some parts the clear blue sky and the welcoming coldness in air. It was a beautiful morning, and I enjoyed soaking in the view.

As I reside in the UAE and currently experiencing the extreme summer months in this region, and when your morning starts with bright and harsh sun rays gleaming through the window and waking you , just close the eyes and  visualize the perfect cold morning of Gudauri.

ashusphotography
ashusphotography
Gudauri, Georgia.
Gudauri, Georgia.

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ashu 🙂

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: LOOK UP

My entry for the weekly photo challenge: Look up.

Georgia, a country famous for its traditional method of wine making and its food. More talk about its food in other posts. The moment I stepped foot in this country, one thing that drew my attention were the beautiful lampposts and the numerous water fountains.

For this weekly photo challenge, I selected couple of pictures from my Georgian travels. These simple, some intricate and tall lampposts made me look up and the blue sky with white clouds that looked like cotton candy made it a perfect click for me. The fruits on the fruit laden trees and the tall trees with branches close together with the towering lamppost amidst it made me instantly click what I saw and liked. In the night, the glowing bulbs of the lamppost in a Tbilisi square were too beautiful to be missed out.

During the hike to the Gergeti Trinity Church in Georgia, after reaching the top, the flight of the Eagle and the blue clear sky above was too beautiful and worth looking up, and hence sharing the picture below.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Look Up
Eagle in the sky
Eagle in the sky
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Look Up
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Look up
Weekly Photo Challenge: Look up
Weekly Photo Challenge: Look up
Lamppost in Tbilisi, Georgia
Lamppost in Tbilisi, Georgia
Lamppost in Tbilisi, Georgia
Lamppost in Tbilisi, Georgia
Weekly Photo Challenge: Look Up
Weekly Photo Challenge: Look Up
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Look up.
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Lamppost in Tbilisi, Georgia

Weekly Photo Challenge: Look Up

Weekly Photo Challenge: Look Up

I found them interesting, loved clicking the pictures, and enjoyed sharing for this post. All the pictures were clicked using my iphone 6 cell camera.

ashu